Jan 20

Integrate Play data into your workflow with data exports

Posted by Frederic Mayot, Google Play team

The Google Play Developer Console makes a wealth of data available to you so you have the insight needed to successfully publish, grow, and monetize your apps and games. We appreciate that some developers want to access and analyze their data beyond the visualization offered today in the Developer Console, which is why we’ve made financial information, crash data, and user reviews available for export. We’re now also making all the statistics on your apps and games (installs, ratings, GCM usage, etc.) accessible via Google Cloud Storage.

New Reports section in the Google Play Developer Console

We’ve added a Reports tab to the Developer Console so that you can view and access all available data exports in one place.

A reliable way to access Google Play data

This is the easiest and most reliable way to download your Google Play Developer Console statistics. You can access all of your reports, including install statistics, reviews, crashes, and revenue.

Programmatic access to Google Play data

This new Google Cloud Storage access will open up a wealth of possibilities. For instance, you can now programmatically:

  • import install and revenue data into your in-house dashboard
  • run custom analysis
  • import crashes and ANRs into your bug tracker
  • import reviews into your CRM to monitor feedback and reply to your users

Your data is available in a Google Cloud Storage bucket, which is most easily accessed using gsutil. To get started, follow these three simple steps to access your reports:

  1. Install the gsutil tool.
    • Authenticate to your account using your Google Play Developer Console credentials.
  2. Find your reporting bucket ID on the new Reports section.
    • Your bucket ID begins with: pubsite_prod_rev (example:pubsite_prod_rev_1234567890)
  3. Use the gsutil ls command to list directories/reports and gsutil cp to copy the reports. Your reports are organized in directories by package name, as well as year and month of their creation.

Read more about exporting report data in the Google Play Developer Help Center.

Note about data ownership on Google Play and Cloud Platform: Your Google Play developer account is gaining access to a dedicated, read-only Google Cloud Storage bucket owned by Google Play. If you’re a Google Cloud Storage customer, the rest of your data is unaffected and not connected to your Google Play developer account. Google Cloud Storage customers can find out more about their data storage on the terms of service page.


Android Developers Blog

Jan 19

Grow your business on Google Play with help from the new Playbook for Developers app

Posted by Dom Elliott, the Google Play team

Today, the Playbook for
Developers
mobile app is now
generally available for Android devices. The app helps you stay up-to-date with
the features and best practices to grow your business on Google Play. Thanks to
all our beta testers over the last six weeks whose feedback helped us tweak and
refine the app in preparation for launch.

Here’s how you read and watch content in the Playbook for Developers app:

  • Choose topics relating to your business interests to personalize My
    Playbook
    with curated articles and videos from Google and experts
    across the web.

  • Explore the in-depth guide to Google’s developer
    products, with articles grouped by what you’re trying to do: develop, launch,
    engage, grow, and earn.

  • Take actions on items – complete, share, save, or dismiss them – and read
    your Saved articles later, including offline if they’re
    written in the app. A data connection will be needed to read articles and videos
    from across the web.

The app supports Android 5.0 and above. We will be adding and updating content
in the app to help you stay up-to-date and grow your business. Get the Playbook
for Developers app today and then give us your feedback. The app is
also available in the following languages: Bahasa
Indonesia, Deutsch,
español
(Latinoamérica), le
français, português
do Brasil, tiếng
Việt, русский
язы́к, 한국어,
中文
(简体), 中文
(繁體), and 日本語.

This is the second app we’ve released for Google Play developers. Get the Google Play Developer Console app to
review your app’s performance statistics and financial data, get notified about
your app’s status and publishing changes, and read and reply to user reviews on
the go.


Android Developers Blog

Jan 18

There’s a lot to explore with Google Play services 7.3

Posted by Ian Lake, Developer Advocate

Today, we’re excited to give you new tools to build better apps with the rollout of Google Play services 7.3. With new Android Wear APIs, the addition of nutrition data to Google Fit, improvements to retrieving the user’s activity and location, and better support for optional APIs, there’s a lot to explore in this release.

Android Wear

Google Play services 7.3 extends the Android Wear network by enabling you to connect multiple Wear devices to a single mobile device.

While the DataApi will automatically sync DataItems across all nodes in the Wear network, the directed nature of the MessageApi is faced with new challenges. What node do you send a message to when the NodeApi starts showing multiple nodes from getConnectedNodes()? This is exactly the use case for the new CapabilityApi, which allows different nodes to advertise that they provide a specific functionality (say, the phone node being able to download images from the internet). This allows you to replace a generic NodeListener with a more specific CapabilityListener, getting only connection results and a list of nodes that have the specific functionality you need. We’ve updated the Sending and Receiving Messages training to explore this new functionality.

Another new addition for Android Wear is the ChannelApi, which provides a bidirectional data connection between two nodes. While assets are the best way to efficiently add binary data to the data layer for synchronization to all devices, this API focuses on sending larger binary data directly between specific nodes. This comes in two forms: sending full files via the sendFile() method (perfect for later offline access) or opening an OutputStream to stream real time binary data. We hope this offers a flexible, low level API to complement the DataApi and MessageApi.

We’ve updated our samples with these changes in mind so go check them out here!

Google Fit

Google Fit makes building fitness apps easier with fitness specific APIs on retrieving sensor data like current location and speed, collecting and storing activity data in Google Fit’s open platform, and automatically aggregating that data into a single view of the user’s fitness data.

To make it even easier to retrieve up-to-date information, Google Play Services 7.3 adds a new method to the HistoryApi: readDailyTotal(). This automatically aggregates data for a given DataType from midnight on the current day through now, giving you a single DataPoint. For TYPE_STEP_COUNT_DELTA, this method does not require any authentication, making it possible to retrieve the current number of steps for today from any application whether on mobile devices or on Android Wear – great for watch faces!

Google Fit is also augmenting its existing data types with granular nutrition information, including protein, fat, cholesterol, and more. By leveraging these details about the user’s diet, developers can help users stay more informed about their health and fitness.

Location

LocationRequest is the heart of the FusedLocationProviderApi, encapsulating the type and frequency of location information you’d like to receive. An important, but small change to LocationRequest is the addition of a maximum wait time for location updates via setMaxWaitTime(). By using a value at least two times larger than the requested interval, the system can batch location updates together, reducing battery usage and, on some devices, actually improving location accuracy.

For any ongoing location requests, it is important to know that you will continue to get good location data back. The SettingsApi is still incredibly useful for confirming that user settings are optimal before you put in a LocationRequest, however, it isn’t the best approach for continual monitoring. For that, you can use the new LocationCallback class in place of your existing LocationListener to receive LocationAvailability updates in addition to location updates, giving you a simple callback whenever settings might have changed which will affect the current set of LocationRequests. You can also use FusedLocationProviderApi’s getLocationAvailability() to retrieve the current state on demand.

Connecting to Google Play services

One of the biggest benefits of GoogleApiClient is that it provides a single connection state, whether you are connecting to a single API or multiple APIs. However, this made it hard to work with APIs that might not be available on all devices, such as the Wearable API. This release makes it much easier to work with APIs that may not always be available with the addition of an addApiIfAvailable() method ensuring that unavailable APIs do not hold up the connection process. The current state for each API can then be retrieved via getConnectionResult(), giving you a way to check at runtime whether an API is available and connected.

While GoogleApiClient’s connection process already takes care of checking for Google Play services availability, if you are not using GoogleApiClient, you’ll find many of the static utility methods in GooglePlayServicesUtil such as isGooglePlayServicesAvailable() have now been moved to the singleton GoogleApiAvailability class. We hope the move away from static methods helps you when writing tests, ensuring your application can properly handle any error cases.

SDK is now available!

Google Play services 7.3 is now available: get started with updated SDK now!

To learn more about Google Play services and the APIs available to you through it, visit the Google Play services section on the Android Developer site.

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+Android Developers


Android Developers Blog

Jan 16

Helping You Go Global with More Seamless Google Play Payments

By Ibrahim Elbouchikhi, Google Play Product Manager

Sales of apps and games on Google Play are up by more than 300 percent over the past year. And today, two-thirds of Google Play purchases happen outside of the United States, with international sales continuing to climb. We’re hoping to fuel this momentum by making Google Play payments easier and more convenient for people around the world.

PayPal support

Starting today, we’re making it possible for people to choose PayPal for their Google Play purchases in 12 countries, including the U.S., Germany, and Canada. When you make a purchase on Google Play in these countries, you’ll find PayPal as an option in your Google Wallet; just enter your PayPal account login and you’ll easily be able to make purchases. Our goal is to provide users with a frictionless payment experience, and this new integration is another example of how we work with partners from across the payments industry to deliver this to the user.

Carrier billing and Google Play gift cards in more countries

Carrier billing—which lets people charge purchases in Google Play directly to their phone bill—continues to be a popular way to pay. We’ve just expanded coverage to seven more countries for a total of 24, including Singapore, Thailand and Taiwan. That means almost half of all Google Play users have this option when making their purchases.

We’ve also made Google Play gift cards available to a total of 13 countries, including Japan and Germany.

Support for developer sales in more countries

Developers based in 13 new countries can now sell apps on Google Play (with new additions such as Indonesia, Malaysia and Turkey), bringing the total to 45 countries with support for local developers. We’ve also increased our buyer currency support to 28 new countries, making it even easier for you to tailor your pricing in 60 countries.

Nothing for you to do!

Of course, as developers, when it comes to payments, there’s nothing for you to do; we process all payments, reconcile all currencies globally, and make a monthly deposit in your designated bank account. This means you get to focus on what you do best: creating beautiful and engaging apps and games.

Visit developer.android.com for more information.

Per-country availability of forms of payment is summarized here.

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+Android Developers


Android Developers Blog

Jan 15

Meet the finalists of the Google Play Indie Games Contest in Europe

Posted by Adriana Puchianu, Developer Marketing Google Play

Back in October we launched the 2nd edition of the Google Play Indie
Games Contest in Europe, with the aim to identify, showcase and reward indie
gaming talent from more than 30 countries. We were amazed by the innovation and
creativity that indie developers from the region have to offer.

Selecting just 20 finalists has once again been a huge challenge. We had a lot
of fun playing the games that will go on to showcase at the Saatchi
Gallery on February 13th in London. Without further ado, we are happy
to announce the Top 20 finalists of this year’s edition. Congratulations to the
finalists and thanks to everyone else who has entered the contest.

A
Planet of Mine

Tuesday Quest

France

Bridge
Constructor Portal

ClockStone Softwareentwicklung GmbH

Austria

Bury
me, my Love

Playdius

France

Captain
Tom Galactic Traveler

Picodongames

France

Core

FURYJAM

Russia

Flat
Pack

Nitrome

United Kingdom

Fern
Flower

Macaque

Poland

I
Love Hue

Zut!

United Kingdom

Jodeo

Gamebra.in

Turkey

Kami
2

State of Play

United Kingdom

Kenshō

FIFTYTWO

Russia

No
More Buttons

Tommy Søreide Kjær

Norway

Old
Man’s Journey

Broken Rules Interactive Media GmbH

Austria

Broken
Rules Interactive Media GmbH

Developster

Germany

The
Big Journey

Catfishbox

Ukraine

The
House of Da Vinci

Blue Brain Games, s.r.o.

Slovakia

The
Office Quest

11Sheep

Israel

Unbalance

TVEE

Turkey

Undervault

Andriy Bychkovskyi

Ukraine

yellow

Bart Bonte

Belgium

Check out the prizes

All the 20 finalists are getting:

  • A paid trip to London to showcase their game at the Final held at Saatchi
    Gallery
  • Inclusion of their game on a promotional billboard in London for 1 month
  • Inclusion of their game in a dedicated Indie Games Contest collection on the
    Indie Corner for one month in more than 40 countries across EMEA
  • Two (2) tickets to attend a 2018 Playtime event, an invitation-only event
    for top apps and games developers on Google Play
  • One (1) Pixel 2 device

They will also have the chance to win more
prizes at the final event.

Join the Google Play team and the finalists at the final event:

Anyone can now register
to attend the final
showcase event for free at the Saatchi Gallery in London on 13
February 2018
. Come and play some great games and have fun with indie
developers, industry experts, and the Google Play team.


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Android Developers Blog

Jan 12

Android Developer Story: Sendy uses Google Play features to build for the next billion users

Posted by Lily Sheringham, Google Play team

Sendy
is a door to door on-demand couriering platform founded in Nairobi, Kenya. It
connects customers and logistics providers, providing two unique apps, one for
the driver and one for the customer. Watch CEO & Co-founder, Meshack Alloys, and
Android Developer, Jason Rogena, explain how they use Developer Console
features, such as alpha and beta testing, as well as other tips and best
practices, to build for the next billion users.

Learn
more about building for billions and get more tips to grow your games
business by opting-in
to the Playbook app beta and download
the Playbook app in the Google Play Store.


Android Developers Blog

Dec 30

Google Play services 4.4

gps

A new release of Google Play services has begun rolling out worldwide, and as usual we have a number of features that can make your apps better than before. This release includes a major enhancement to Maps with the introduction of Street View, as well as new features in Location, Games Services, Mobile Ads, and Wallet API.

Here are the highlights of Google Play services release 4.4:

Google Maps Android API

Starting with a much anticipated announcement for the Google Maps Android API: Introducing Street View. You can now embed Street View imagery into an activity enabling your users to explore the world through panoramic 360-degree views. Programmatically control the zoom and orientation (tilt and bearing) of the Street View camera, and animate the camera movements over a given duration. Here is an example of what you can do with the API, where the user navigates forward one step:

We’ve also added more features to the Indoor Maps feature of the API. You can turn the default floor picker off – useful if you want to build your own. You can also detect when a new building comes into focus, and find the currently-active building and floor. Great if you want to show custom markup for the active level, for example.

Activity Recognition

And while we are on the topic of maps, let’s turn to some news in the Location API. For those of you that have used this API, you may have seen the ability already there to detect if the device is in a vehicle, on a bicycle, on foot, still, or tilting.

In this release, two new activity detectors have been added: Running, and Walking. So a great opportunity to expand your app to be even more responsive to your users. And for you that have not worked with this capability earlier, we hardly need to tell the cool things you can do with it. Just imagine combining this capability with features in Maps, Games Services, and other parts of Location…

Games Services Update

In the 4.3 release we introduced Game Gifts, which allows you to request gifts or wishes. And although there are no external API changes this time, the default requests sending UI has been extended to now allow the user to select multiple Game Gifts recipients. For your games this means more collaboration and social engagement between your players.

Mobile Ads

For Mobile Ads, we’ve added new APIs for publishers to display in-app promo ads, which enables users to purchase advertised items directly. We’re offering app developers control of targeting specific user segments with ads, for example offering high-value users an ad for product A, or new users with an ad for product B, etc.

With these extensions, users can conveniently purchase in-app items that interest them, advertisers can reach consumers, and your app connects the dots; a win-win-win in other words.

Wallet Fragments

For the Instant Buy API, we’ve now reduced the work involved to place a Buy With Google button in an app. The WalletFragment API introduced in this release makes it extremely easy to integrate Google Wallet Instant Buy with an existing app. Just configure these fragments and add them to your app.

And that’s another release of Google Play services. We will let you know once the rollout is complete with updated reference material. Coming up in June is Google I/O, no need to say more…

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+Android Developers


Android Developers Blog

Dec 29

A look back at the most read Google Play posts on Medium in 2017

Posted by Sergejs Cuhrajs, Community Manager, Google Play

Earlier this year we launched the Google Play Apps & Games publication on
Medium to help developers discover best practices and insights to grow
successful apps and games businesses on Google Play. As we draw closer to the
end of the year we thought it’s a good time to revisit some of our most popular
posts according to you – our readers.

It’s clear that many of you are excited by the potential of new technology, such
as Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), and how it could enhance
user interaction with your apps and games. You’re also concerned with everyday
issues including how to keep your APK size manageable, how to acquire new users,
and how to monetize games without pushing away your players.

So without further adieu, here’s the list of the top 10:

  1. Applying
    human-centered design to emerging technologies

    (by By Peter Hyer, Fabian Herrmann, and Kristin Kelly, 7 min read)

    VR, AR, and digital assistant present exciting opportunities for the future, but how can we ensure
    we’re designing for what people really want?

  2. Shrinking
    APKs, growing installs

    (by Sam Tolomei, 6 min read)
    Smaller APK
    sizes correlate with higher install conversion rate on Google Play – we share
    tips for keeping your apps lean.

  3. Who
    plays mobile games?

    (by Allen Bevans, UX Researcher at Google, 6 min
    read)

    Four actionable insights for game developers based on our research
    into different player segments.

  4. Why
    the first ten minutes are crucial if you want to keep players coming back

    (by Adam Carpenter, 7 min read)

    How to analyze your retention data so you can keep players coming back again
    and again.

  5. Design
    your app for decision-making
    (by Jeni Fisher, 10 min read)
    Useful
    tips and strategies for encouraging desired user behavior in your apps. Also
    check out follow-up posts on boosting
    motivation through app rewards, and common
    pitfalls of persuasive app design.

  6. Predicting
    your app’s monetization future

    (by Ignacio Monereo, 10 min read)
    Learn about predictive analytics and calculating your apps lifetime value (LTV)
    to gain practical insight into the future of your app. In the second part
    Ignacio shares how to calculate
    LTV based on five popular monetization models.

  7. Five
    tips to improve your games-as-a-service monetization
    (by Moonlit
    Beshimov, 9 min read)

    5 proven strategies to improve your game revenue
    without driving players away.

  8. An
    introduction to in-app A/B testing

    (by Gavin Kinghall Were, 13 min
    read)

    Learn how in-app A/B testing can drive insight into your app’s future
    design and development, and maximise its performance.

  9. Taking
    the guesswork out of paid user acquisition

    (by David Yin, 8 min
    read)

    A simple tool to help you estimate lifetime value (LTV) of your users
    and what to spend to grow your audience.

  10. Rethinking
    interface assumptions in AR: selecting objects

    (by Aaron Cammarata, 8
    min read)

    In this article for beginner AR developers we explore one of the
    most fundamental user interface actions: object selection.

Do you have suggestions for topics we should tackle in 2018? Let us know by
tweeting with the hashtag #AskPlayDev and we’ll reply from @GooglePlayDev, where we regularly
share news and tips on how to be successful on Google Play.

How useful did you find this blogpost?






Android Developers Blog

Dec 27

Helping developers connect with families on Google Play

Posted by Eunice Kim, Product Manager, Google Play

There are thousands of Android developers creating experiences for families and children — apps and games that broaden the mind and inspire creativity. These developers, like PBS Kids, Tynker and Crayola, carefully tailor their apps to provide high quality, age appropriate content; from optimizing user interface design for children to building interactive features that both educate and entertain.

Google Play is committed to the success of this emerging developer community, so today we’re introducing a new program called Designed for Families, which allows developers to designate their apps and games as family-friendly. Participating apps will be eligible for upcoming family-focused experiences on Google Play that will help parents discover great, age-appropriate content and make more informed choices.

Starting now, developers can opt in their app or game through the Google Play Developer Console. From there, our team will review the submission to verify that it meets the Designed for Families program requirements. In the coming weeks, we’ll be adding new ways to promote family content to users on Google Play — we’ll have more to share on this soon.

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Android Developers Blog

Dec 24

Android Developer Story: Vietnamese games developer Divmob finds more users with localized pricing on Google Play

Posted by Lily Sheringham, Google Play team

Based in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam, games developer Divmob has grown quickly from an original team of five people to 40 employees since
it was founded three years ago. Divmob now has over 40 million downloads across
its various titles, including the popular game, Epic Heroes War.

Watch Ngo Van Luyen, CEO & Founder at Divmob, and his team explain how
introducing sub-dollar pricing in various markets resulted in a 300% increase
in daily transactions, and increased the number of paying users threefold.

Find out more about local pricing models on Google Play

We recently introduced new features in the Google Play Developer Console to
help you meet local expectations when setting prices, to make purchases more
attractive to your users. The Developer Console will now automatically round
pricing to local conventions in each market, and you can also set up pricing
templates to manage pricing across multiple currencies more efficiently, and
easily make bulk changes to the prices of multiple apps and in-app products in
a single click. Learn more about the improved local pricing tools.


Android Developers Blog