Sep 14

Google and Ideas United Launch Program to Support Inclusivity in Game Design


Posted by Daraiha Greene, CS Education in Media Program Manager, Multicultural
Strategy, and Kate Brennan and Mathilde Cohen Solal, Google Play

Today, we are thrilled to announce Infinite Deviation: Games. Infinite Deviation is an
initiative created by Google Computer Science (CS) in Media and Ideas United in order to
tackle issues of representation by bringing creativity and computer science
together in unexpected ways — ensuring that representations of computer
scientists are inclusive of women, people of color, the LGBTQIA+ community,
people with disabilities, and other underrepresented groups. Last year, Infinite
Deviation produced a series of narrative
short films to dispel stereotypes in computer science and is excited to
collaborate with Google Play to bring the Infinite Deviation program to gaming.

Currently only 23%
of people in the gaming industry identify as women and only 3%
of game developers are African-American. From ensuring women are represented
in video
games to giving young girls the chance to create
their own games, Google Play is committed to bringing new, diverse voices to
gaming. The program gives game designers from all backgrounds the chance to
pitch an original mobile game concept and have it developed, published, and
promoted in partnership with Google Play. Applicants can submit their mobile
game concepts until October 9.

The top three ideas will be chosen by a panel of industry experts and designers
will receive the resources and support they need to bring their games to life on
Google Play. Games will be judged on creativity and innovation, as well as their
ability to tell original stories that resonate with underrepresented audiences.

Participants must have less than two years of professional game design
experience in order to be eligible. For more information on the program,
including how to apply, you can visit InfiniteDeviation.com.

By promoting original games that resonate with underrepresented audiences, we
hope the program creates more favorable perceptions of computer science, bust
biases, and nurture acceptance through an activity many enjoy.


Android Developers Blog

Aug 08

Your next growth market on Google Play: launch your title in Russia

Posted by Dmitri Martynov, Business Development, Google Play

For many international developers Russia is considered to be an opportunity to
grow their app or games business. According to the 2017 report on the ‘Mobile
Internet Economy in Russia [PDF]‘, Russia’s population is young with 45% of
people being under 35 years old.1
The report also found that mobile subscriptions are at 160% of the population of
146 million people, meaning people with data plans have more than one on average
– considerably higher than other well connected countries.2
Last year Android accounted for 84% of all smartphones in Russia and smartphone
shipments are still growing with demand up 11% in early 2017 compared to 2016.

Russian people are very engaged in terms of smartphone mobile usage, Russia is
one of the top countries in terms of apps downloaded per person3.
Half of the population are gamers; their favorite game genres being strategy,
builders and farms, shooters, puzzles and fighters. The most popular app
categories are dating (with strong local developers), music & video, social &
messaging and shopping.4

Tips to help you successfully localize for Russian

Along with understanding Russian mobile trends, there are market specific best
practices which can help you tailor your apps and games for a local audience to
increase your chance of business success.

  • Language localization
    • Proofread and quality assure your entire app or game after translating text
      resources and visual assets. After localization, you should quality assure your
      app or game as a whole and not just text resources.

    • Use proficient native speakers. Contextually relevant translations are best
      done by native speakers familiar with mobile apps or games terminology.

    • Localize all content where possible. Aim to provide as much localized
      content as possible, providing a similar level in the local language as the
      original.

    • Ensure consistent language and style. Semantically check the translated
      text in the context of the whole app/game experience to make it look and sound
      relevant to local users. Ensure use of consistent language style (such as
      formal/informal addressing) and use of the same terms or names across all the
      text and visual assets.

    • Don’t forget language rules. Follow language rules on
      quantities, gender, word breaking, acronyms, etc. If the user gender is unknown,
      consider making a careful choice of words so that to omit specifying user’s
      gender or use a passive voice.

    • Be aware of the length of translated text. In Cyrillic languages words and
      phrases tend to be longer than English, and might not fit into a tightly
      designed UI. Be creative in finding alternative contextually and locally
      relevant alternative translations.

    • Use local date and time formats. Check the country specific date / time format which local users are familiar with.
    • Take note of the “you” translation. “You” translation is contextual and can
      be translated to singular (similar to early modern english thou) or
      plural form (when refer to multiple people or in polite form). And as a
      reminder, when choosing to address your user informally (“thou”), make sure to
      avoid specifying user’s gender, unless it is known.
  • Play Store assets
    • Provide localized store assets, such as the title (for example when title
      is not a universally known brand), store listing, screenshots and videos. Do not
      forget to localize the “what’s new” section if included.

    • Avoid keywords in your app or game title which attempt to improve its
      visibility on the Play Store.
  • Local pricing, price points, rounding rules
    • Avoid adding your own currency indicators (such as $ or £) as some markets
      use local pricing -
      find out more about local pricing. Use the Russian Ruble official symbol (₽)
      after the number with a space, and use comma as a decimal separator, e.g. 49,99
      ₽.

    • Generally, in-app, subscriptions, or paid app/games prices should be lower
      than in Western markets. Research industry best practices and experiment which
      price points are best for your app or game business model.

    • Make sure price rounding follows the “99″ or “49″ rules. Use
      the Google Play Console to set local prices.
  • Text resources
    • Avoid abbreviations, and if shortening is absolutely necessary, follow
      language rules to shorten words.

    • Avoid breaking single words and punctuation into a new line. Follow
      language rules of breaking words across lines (such as app- and -lication).

    • Ensure consistent font styles. Some font families may be displayed
      differently in non-English locales. Always check how your chosen font will be
      displayed on user devices in different locales.
  • In-game visual and audio assets
    • When appropriate and relevant, consider localizing visual assets in
      addition to text strings. Pay attention to splash screens!

    • Localize video and audio, and use native speakers to make it sound locally
      relevant.

For more guidance, read the localization
checklist.

Nominate your title for the “Now in Russian” collection on the Google Play
Store

On July 24st we launched the first Now
in Russian collection on Google Play, featuring 24 titles from international
developers such as Kabam’s
Transformers, GTarcade’s
Legacy of Discord, Yodo1′s
Crossy Road, im30′s
Last Empire – War Z and others.

We are planning to refresh the collection by the end of the year and we would
love to include your title! Submit
your recently localized title for a chance to be included.

How useful did you find this blogpost?








Android Developers Blog

Mar 22

Google Developers teams up with General Assembly to launch Android Development Immersive training course

Posted by Peter Lubbers, Senior Program Manager, Google Developer Training

Today at the Big Android BBQ we announced that we have teamed up with General Assembly (GA), a global education institution transforming thinkers into creators, to create a new Android Development Immersive training course. This 12-week, full-time course will be offered beginning in January 2016 at GA’s New York campus, and in February at GA’s San Francisco campus and will roll out to additional campuses over the course of the next year. It is the first in-person training program of its kind that Google Developers has designed and built.

The Google Developer Relations team teamed up with General Assembly to ensure the Android Development Immersive bootcamp provides developers with access to the best instructors and latest and greatest hands-on material to create successful app experiences and businesses. To effectively reach over a billion of Android users globally, it’s important for developers to build high-quality apps that are beautifully designed, performant, and delightful to use.

“We are constantly looking at the economy and job market for what skills are most in-demand. Demand for developers who can address this market and build new applications is tremendous,” said Jake Schwartz, co-founder and CEO, General Assembly. “Developing this course in partnership with Google Developers allows us to provide students with the most relevant skills, ensuring a reliable pipeline of talented developers ready to meet the urgent demand of companies in the Android ecosystem, a key component of GA’s education-to-employment model.”

Registration in the Android Development Immersive includes access to GA’s career preparation services and support, also known as Outcomes, includes assistance in creating portfolio-ready projects, access to career development workshops, networking events, and coaching and support in the job search process. Through in-person hiring events, mock interviews & GA’s online job search platform, graduates connect with GA’s hiring partners, which consists of close to 2,000 employers globally.

One of these employers is Vice Media. “I’m really excited to see the candidates coming out of the GA Android course. The fact that they’re working with both Google and potential employers to shape the curriculum around real-world problems will make a huge difference. Textbook learning is one thing, but classroom learning with practitioners is a level we have all been waiting for. In fact, Vice Media is going to be hiring an apprentice right out of this course,” said Ben Jackson, Director of Mobile Apps for Vice Media.

Learn more and sign up here.


Android Developers Blog

Mar 19

Android Developer Story: RogerVoice takes advantage of beta testing to launch its app on Android first

Posted by Lily Sheringham, Google Play team

RogerVoice is an app which enables people who are hearing impaired to make phone calls through voice recognition and text captions. Founded by Olivier Jeannel, who grew up with more than 80 percent hearing loss, the company successfully raised $ 35,000 through Kickstarter to get off the ground. Today the team publicly released the app on the Android platform first.

The team behind RogerVoice talk about how material design and beta testing helped them create an interface which is accessible and intuitive to navigate for users.


Learn more about how RogerVoice built its app with the help of Google Play features:

  • Material Design: How Material Design helps you create beautiful, engaging apps.
  • Beta testing: Learn more about using beta testing on Google Play for your app.
  • Developer Console: Make the most of the Google Play Developer Console to publish your apps and grow and engage your user base.


Android Developers Blog

Dec 16

Indie game developers in Latin America sustain growth after launch on Google Play

Posted by Kacey Fahey, Marketing Programs Manager, Google Play

Indie game developers are some of the most exciting and innovative teams to work
with. While developers large and small exist on the same field, gone are the
days where you hit publish and turn your back, moving on to the next project. We’ve
gathered a few developer stories coming out of Latin America sharing experiences
and advice.

Oktagon Games

Ronaldo Cruz, Founder and CEO of Oktagon
Games tells us how “reviews provide great qualitative insight on the
game helping us identify problems that may not be caught by analytics.”


Tiny Bytes

Tiny
Bytes reduced churn by 5% using an in-game tutorial and analytics.

Impossible Apps

Cleverson Schmidt of Impossible
Apps shares how introducing in-app purchases helps diversify revenue streams
and “can make the game profitable and self sustainable.”


How useful did you find this blogpost?


Android Developers Blog

Dec 02

Indie game developers in Latin America sustain growth after launch on Google Play

Posted by Kacey Fahey, Marketing Programs Manager, Google Play

Indie game developers are some of the most exciting and innovative teams to work
with. While developers large and small exist on the same field, gone are the
days where you hit publish and turn your back, moving on to the next project. We’ve
gathered a few developer stories coming out of Latin America sharing experiences
and advice.

Oktagon Games

Ronaldo Cruz, Founder and CEO of Oktagon
Games tells us how “reviews provide great qualitative insight on the
game helping us identify problems that may not be caught by analytics.”


Tiny Bytes

Tiny
Bytes reduced churn by 5% using an in-game tutorial and analytics.

Impossible Apps

Cleverson Schmidt of Impossible
Apps shares how introducing in-app purchases helps diversify revenue streams
and “can make the game profitable and self sustainable.”


How useful did you find this blogpost?


Android Developers Blog