Aug 18

Android Wear 2.0 for China – Developer Preview

Posted by Hoi Lam, Developer Advocate

Today at Google
Developer Day China, we are happy to announce a developer preview
of Android Wear 2.0 for developers creating apps for China. Android Wear 2.0 is
the biggest update since our partners launched their first devices in China last
year.

We’re making a Developer Preview available today and plan to release additional
updates in the coming months. Please send us your feedback by filing bugs or posting in our Android Wear
Developers community.

Developing for the Chinese Market

With Android Wear 2.0, apps can access the internet directly on Android Wear
devices. As a result, for the majority of apps, having a companion phone
application is no longer necessary. This means that most developers creating
apps for Android Wear 2.0 may no longer need to import the Google Play services
library.

There are two situations where developers will need to import Google Play
services for China:

  • Apps that require direct interaction with the paired mobile
    device
    – some experiences require Android Wear to connect directly to a
    paired phone. In this case, the Data
    Layer API introduced in Android Wear 1.0 will continue to function.

  • New FusedLocationProvider
    for China
    – we have added location detection to the SDK for Chinese
    developers. With the user’s permission, your app can receive location updates
    via the FusedLocationProvider.

You can find more details about how to import the China compatible version of
Google Play services library here.

Product testing for Android Wear 2.0 for China

The Android Wear 2.0 Developer Preview includes an updated SDK with tools, and
system images for testing using the Huawei Watch.

To get started, follow these steps:

  • Update to Android Studio v2.1.1 or later
  • Visit the Android Wear 2.0
    Developer Preview site for downloads and documentation

  • Download
    the device system images

  • Test your app with your supported device

Give us feedback

We will update this developer preview over the next few months based on your
feedback. The sooner we hear from you, the more we can include in the final
release, so don’t be shy!

Android Wear 2.0 中国版 – 开发者预览版

编辑: 林海泉, Android Wear 开发平台负责人

今天在上海举办的Google
开发者大会上,我们正式宣布了一款专门针对中国市场的Android Wear 2.0 开发者预览版。Android Wear
2.0系统,将是自我们的合作伙伴首次发布手表产品以来最重大的更新。

开发者预览版已于今日正式上线。与此同时,我们也计划在未来的几个月内持续进行更新。请您将您遇到的问题在此提交反馈,或者在我们的Android
Wear开发者论坛发表意见。

为中国市场开发应用

在Android Wear 2.0系统中,应用可以由Android
Wear手表直接连接至互联网。因此,对于大多数应用来说,手机端的伴侣应用也就变得不再必要。这也意味着,多数为Android Wear
2.0开发应用的开发者将不再需要引用Google Play services客户端库。

目前,在两个情况下开发者仍然需要引入Google Play Services客户端库来为中国市场开发应用:

  • 需要与手机直接进行通信的应用 – 有一些用例需要Android
    Wear手表与已配对手机直接连接。在这种情况下,Android Wear 1.0中引入的Data
    Layer API仍然可以继续使用。

  • 使用 FusedLocationProvider
    - 我们在最新的中国版SDK中加入了定位的支持。在用户的许可下,您的应用可以通过FusedLocationProvider来接收定位更新。

您可以在这里找到关于如何引入与中国版兼容的Google
Play service的更多信息。

Android Wear 2.0 中国版产品测试

Android Wear 2.0 开发者预览版包括最新的SDK套件,手表测试系统镜像(基于华为手表)。

情按照以下步骤进行测试:

  • 更新到Android Studio至v2.1.1以上版本
  • 访问 Android Wear
    2.0 开发者预览版,那里的文件下载与文档下载部分

  • 下载手表系统镜像
  • 在手表上测试您的应用

开发反馈

我们会根据您的反馈在未来的几个月中更新开发者预览版。您给我们的反馈越早,我们将会在最终的发布版本中包含更多针对您的反馈的解决方案。敬请期待!


Android Developers Blog

Aug 17

Android Wear 2.0 Developer Preview 4: Authentication, In-App Billing, and more

Posted by Hoi Lam, Developer
Advocate

A key part of Android Wear 2.0 is letting
watch apps work as standalone apps, so users can respond to messages, track
their fitness, and use their favorite apps, even when their phone isn’t around.
Developer Preview 4 includes a number of new APIs that will help you build more
powerful standalone apps.

Seamless authentication

To make authentication a seamless experience for both Android phone and iPhone
users, we have created new APIs for OAuth
and added support for one-click Google Sign-in. With the OAuth API for
Android Wear, users can tap a button on the watch that opens an authentication
screen on the phone. Your watch app can then authenticate with your server side
APIs directly. With Google Sign-In, it’s even easier. All the user needs to do
is select which account they want to authenticate with and they are done.

In-app billing

In addition to paid apps, we have added in-app
billing support, to give you another way to monetize your Android Wear app
or watch face. Users can authorize purchases quickly and easily on the watch
through a 4-digit Google Account PIN. Whether it’s new levels in a game or new
styles on a watch face, if you can build it, users can buy it.

Cross-device promotion

What if your watch app doesn’t work standalone? Or what if it offers a better
user experience when both the watch and phone apps are installed? We’ve been
listening carefully to your feedback, and we’ve added two
new APIs (PlayStoreAvailability and RemoteIntent)
to help you navigate users to the Play Store on a paired device so they can
more easily install your app. Developers can also open custom URLs on the phone
from the watch via the new RemoteIntent API; no phone app or data
layer is required.

// Check Play Store is available
int playStoreAvailabilityOnPhone =
    PlayStoreAvailability.getPlayStoreAvailabilityOnPhone(getApplicationContext());

if (playStoreAvailabilityOnPhone == PlayStoreAvailability.PLAY_STORE_ON_PHONE_AVAILABLE) {
    // To launch a web URL, setData to Uri.parse("https://g.co/wearpreview")
    Intent intent =
        new Intent(Intent.ACTION_VIEW)
            .addCategory(Intent.CATEGORY_BROWSABLE)
            .setData(Uri.parse("market://details?id=com.google.android.wearable.app"));
    // mResultReceiver is optional; it can be null.
    RemoteIntent.startRemoteActivity(this, intent, mResultReceiver);
}

Swipe-to-dismiss is back

Many of you have given us the feedback that the swipe-to-dismiss gesture from
Android Wear 1.0 is an intuitive time-saver. We agree, and have reverted back to
the previous behavior with this developer preview release. To support
swipe-to-dismiss in this release, we’ve made the following platform and API
changes:

  • Activities now automatically support swipe-to-dismiss.
    Swiping an activity from left to right will result in it being dismissed and the
    app will navigate down the back stack.

  • New Fragment and View support. Developers can wrap the
    containing views of a Fragment or Views in general in the new
    SwipeDismissFrameLayout to implement custom actions such as going
    down the back stack when the user swipes rather than exiting the activity.

  • Hardware button now maps to “power” instead of “back” which
    means it can no longer be intercepted by apps.

Additional details are available under the behavior
changes section of the Android Wear Preview site.

Compatibility with Android Wear 1.0 apps

Android Wear apps packaged using the legacy embedded app mechanism can now be
delivered to Android Wear 2.0 watches. When a user installs a phone app that
also contains an embedded Android Wear app, the user will be prompted to install
the embedded app via a notification. If they choose not to install the embedded
app at that moment, they can find it in the Play Store on Android Wear under a
special section called “Apps you’ve used”.

Despite support for the existing mechanism, there are significant benefits for
apps that transition to the multi-APK
delivery mechanism. Multi-APK allows the app to be searchable in the Play
Store on Android Wear, to be eligible for merchandising on the homepage, and to
be remotely installed from the web to the watch. As a result, we strongly
recommend that developers move to multi-APK.

More additions in Developer Preview 4

  • Action
    and Navigation Drawers: An enhancement to peeking behavior
    allows the user to take action without scrolling all the way to the top or
    bottom of a list. Developers can further fine-tune drawer peeking behavior
    through new APIs, such as setShouldPeekOnScrollDown for the action
    drawer.

  • WearableRecyclerView:
    The curved layout is now opt-in, and with this, the WearableRecyclerView is now
    a drop-in replacement for RecyclerView.

  • Burn-in
    protection icon for complications: Complication data providers can now
    provide icons for use on screens susceptible to burn-in. These burn-in-safe
    icons are normally the outline of the icon in interactive mode. Previously,
    watch faces may have chosen not to display the icon at all in ambient mode to
    prevent screen burn-in.

Feedback welcome!

Thanks for all your terrific feedback on Android Wear 2.0. Check out g.co/wearpreview for the latest builds and
documentation, keep the feedback coming by filing bugs or posting in our Android Wear
Developers community, and stay tuned for Android Wear Developer Preview 5!


Android Developers Blog

Aug 16

Android Wear 2.0 Developer Preview 4: Authentication, In-App Billing, and more

Posted by Hoi Lam, Developer
Advocate

A key part of Android Wear 2.0 is letting
watch apps work as standalone apps, so users can respond to messages, track
their fitness, and use their favorite apps, even when their phone isn’t around.
Developer Preview 4 includes a number of new APIs that will help you build more
powerful standalone apps.

Seamless authentication

To make authentication a seamless experience for both Android phone and iPhone
users, we have created new APIs for OAuth
and added support for one-click Google Sign-in. With the OAuth API for
Android Wear, users can tap a button on the watch that opens an authentication
screen on the phone. Your watch app can then authenticate with your server side
APIs directly. With Google Sign-In, it’s even easier. All the user needs to do
is select which account they want to authenticate with and they are done.

In-app billing

In addition to paid apps, we have added in-app
billing support, to give you another way to monetize your Android Wear app
or watch face. Users can authorize purchases quickly and easily on the watch
through a 4-digit Google Account PIN. Whether it’s new levels in a game or new
styles on a watch face, if you can build it, users can buy it.

Cross-device promotion

What if your watch app doesn’t work standalone? Or what if it offers a better
user experience when both the watch and phone apps are installed? We’ve been
listening carefully to your feedback, and we’ve added two
new APIs (PlayStoreAvailability and RemoteIntent)
to help you navigate users to the Play Store on a paired device so they can
more easily install your app. Developers can also open custom URLs on the phone
from the watch via the new RemoteIntent API; no phone app or data
layer is required.

// Check Play Store is available
int playStoreAvailabilityOnPhone =
    PlayStoreAvailability.getPlayStoreAvailabilityOnPhone(getApplicationContext());

if (playStoreAvailabilityOnPhone == PlayStoreAvailability.PLAY_STORE_ON_PHONE_AVAILABLE) {
    // To launch a web URL, setData to Uri.parse("https://g.co/wearpreview")
    Intent intent =
        new Intent(Intent.ACTION_VIEW)
            .addCategory(Intent.CATEGORY_BROWSABLE)
            .setData(Uri.parse("market://details?id=com.google.android.wearable.app"));
    // mResultReceiver is optional; it can be null.
    RemoteIntent.startRemoteActivity(this, intent, mResultReceiver);
}

Swipe-to-dismiss is back

Many of you have given us the feedback that the swipe-to-dismiss gesture from
Android Wear 1.0 is an intuitive time-saver. We agree, and have reverted back to
the previous behavior with this developer preview release. To support
swipe-to-dismiss in this release, we’ve made the following platform and API
changes:

  • Activities now automatically support swipe-to-dismiss.
    Swiping an activity from left to right will result in it being dismissed and the
    app will navigate down the back stack.

  • New Fragment and View support. Developers can wrap the
    containing views of a Fragment or Views in general in the new
    SwipeDismissFrameLayout to implement custom actions such as going
    down the back stack when the user swipes rather than exiting the activity.

  • Hardware button now maps to “power” instead of “back” which
    means it can no longer be intercepted by apps.

Additional details are available under the behavior
changes section of the Android Wear Preview site.

Compatibility with Android Wear 1.0 apps

Android Wear apps packaged using the legacy embedded app mechanism can now be
delivered to Android Wear 2.0 watches. When a user installs a phone app that
also contains an embedded Android Wear app, the user will be prompted to install
the embedded app via a notification. If they choose not to install the embedded
app at that moment, they can find it in the Play Store on Android Wear under a
special section called “Apps you’ve used”.

Despite support for the existing mechanism, there are significant benefits for
apps that transition to the multi-APK
delivery mechanism. Multi-APK allows the app to be searchable in the Play
Store on Android Wear, to be eligible for merchandising on the homepage, and to
be remotely installed from the web to the watch. As a result, we strongly
recommend that developers move to multi-APK.

More additions in Developer Preview 4

  • Action
    and Navigation Drawers: An enhancement to peeking behavior
    allows the user to take action without scrolling all the way to the top or
    bottom of a list. Developers can further fine-tune drawer peeking behavior
    through new APIs, such as setShouldPeekOnScrollDown for the action
    drawer.

  • WearableRecyclerView:
    The curved layout is now opt-in, and with this, the WearableRecyclerView is now
    a drop-in replacement for RecyclerView.

  • Burn-in
    protection icon for complications: Complication data providers can now
    provide icons for use on screens susceptible to burn-in. These burn-in-safe
    icons are normally the outline of the icon in interactive mode. Previously,
    watch faces may have chosen not to display the icon at all in ambient mode to
    prevent screen burn-in.

Feedback welcome!

Thanks for all your terrific feedback on Android Wear 2.0. Check out g.co/wearpreview for the latest builds and
documentation, keep the feedback coming by filing bugs or posting in our Android Wear
Developers community, and stay tuned for Android Wear Developer Preview 5!


Android Developers Blog

Aug 02

Android Developer Story: Zabob Studio and Buff Studio reach global users with Google Play

Posted by Lily Sheringham, Google Play team

South Korean Games developers Zabob Studio and Buff Studio are start-ups seeking to become major players in the global mobile games industry.

Established in 2013, Zabob Studio was set up by Kwon Dae-hyeon and his wife in 2013. This couple-run business but they have already published ten games, including hits ‘Zombie Judgement Day’ and ‘Infinity Dungeon.’ So far, the company has generated more than KRW ₩140M (approximately $ 125,000 USD) in sales revenue, with about 60 percent of the studio’s downloads coming from international markets, such as Taiwan and Brazil.

Elsewhere, Buff Studio was founded in 2014 and right from the start, its first game Buff Knight was an instant hit. It was even featured as the ‘Game of the Week’ on Google Play and was included in “30 Best Games of 2014” lists. A sequel is already in the works showing the potential of the franchise.

In this video, Kwon Dae-hyeon, CEO of Zabob Studio ,and Kim Do-Hyeong, CEO of Buff Studio, talk about how Google Play services and the Google Play Developer Console have helped them maintain a competitive edge, market their games efficiently to global users and grow revenue on the platform.

Android Developer Story: Buff Studio – Reaching global users with Google Play

Android Developer Story: Zabob Studio – Growing revenue with Google Play

Check Zabob Studio apps and Buff Knight on Google Play!

We’re pleased to share that Android Developer Stories will now come with translated subtitles on YouTube in popular languages around the world. Find out how to turn on YouTube captions. To read locally translated blog posts, visit the Google developer blog in Korean.

Join the discussion on

+Android Developers


Android Developers Blog

Jul 31

Updated Udacity Android course prepares students for the Associate Android Developer Certification

Posted by Jocelyn Becker, Senior Program Manager, Android Training

As one of our most popular Udacity courses, the Developing Android Apps
course was recently updated to ensure developers have the resources to build
high quality apps. This course, which has already helped more than half a
million developers learn to build Android apps, has been through the car wash
and come out sparkling clean and updated.

Google and Udacity have worked together to update the course to include the very
latest changes in Android and Android Studio, including how to use the new
Constraint Layout editor, and how to use Firebase Job Dispatcher. Learn best
practices for building Android apps using Android 7.0 (Nougat) while keeping
your apps backwards compatible in older versions, learning at your own pace in
your own time.

You sent us feedback that some of the lessons were a little difficult to get
through, so we’ve restructured the lessons and added smaller apps for you to
build as you progress through the course. So not only will you build the
Sunshine weather app as a complete, integrated application that spans the entire
course, but you’ll also create an app in each lesson to help you learn
individual concepts.

Build a To Do app and add new tasks as you learn how to build a ContentProvider.

This course brings back Android experts Dan Galpin and Reto Meier from Google, and Lyla Fujiwara from Udacity, and introduces new faces from Google and Udacity.


Start learning now at https://www.udacity.com/course/ud851.

Combined package for Developing Android Apps course and Associate
Android Developer Certification

This updated course teaches the skills that are tested by the Associate Android
Developer certification exam. Udacity is offering a package that combines the
updated Developing Android Apps course with a voucher for the Associate Android
Developer certification exam. If you pass this exam, you will earn the Associate
Android Developer Certification and show that you are competent and skilled in
tasks that an entry-level Android developer typically performs. Enroll in
Udacity’s Fast
Track to get prepared and take the Associate Android developer exam at: https://www.udacity.com/course/nd818.


Android Developers Blog

Jul 29

Android Developer Story: Le Monde increases subscriptions with Google Play Billing

Watch Edouard Andrieu, Director of Mobile, and Ahcene Amrouz, Product Manager
for Mobile, explain how La Matinale has a 6% higher subscription conversion on
Android than on other platforms thanks to tools like Google Play Billing.

Learn more how to add
an introductory price to your subscription, and get the
News Publisher Playbook to stay up-to-date with more features and best
practices to help you find success for your news apps on Google Play.

How useful did you find this blogpost?


Android Developers Blog

Jul 19

Final update to Android 7.1 Developer Preview

Posted by Dave Burke, VP of Engineering

Today we’re rolling out an update to the Android 7.1 Developer Preview — the
last before we release the final Android 7.1.1 platform to the ecosystem.
Android 7.1.1 includes the developer features already available on Pixel and
Pixel XL devices and adds optimizations and bug fixes on top of the base Android
7.1 platform. With Developer Preview 2, you can make sure your apps are ready
for Android 7.1.1 and the consumers that will soon be running it on their
devices.

As highlighted
in October, we’re also expanding the range of devices that can receive this
Developer Preview update to Nexus 5X, Nexus 6P, Nexus 9, and Pixel C.

If you have a supported device that’s enrolled in the Android Beta Program, you’ll receive an
update to Developer Preview 2 over the coming week. If you haven’t enrolled your
device yet, just visit the site to
enroll your device and get the update.

In early December, we’ll roll out Android 7.1.1 to the full lineup of supported
devices as well as Pixel and Pixel XL devices.

What’s in this update?

Developer Preview 2 is a release candidate for Android 7.1.1 that you can use to
complete your app development and testing in preparation for the upcoming final
release. In includes near-final system behaviors and UI, along with the latest
bug fixes and optimizations across the system and Google apps.

It also includes the developer features and APIs (API level 25) already
introduced in Developer Preview 1. If you haven’t explored the developer
features, you’ll want to take a look at app shortcuts,
round
icon resources, and image keyboard
support, among others — you can see the full list of
developer features here.

With Developer Preview 2, we’re also updating the SDK build and platform tools
in Android Studio, the Android 7.1.1 platform, and the API Level 25 emulator
system images. The latest version of the support library (25.0.1)
is also available for you to add
image keyboard support, bottom
navigation, and other features for devices running API Level 25 or earlier.

For details on API Level 25 check out the API
diffs and the updated API
reference on the developer preview
site.

Get your apps ready for Android 7.1

Now is the time to optimize your apps to look their best on Android 7.1.1. To
get started, update to Android
Studio 2.2.2 and then download the API Level 25 platform, emulator system
images, and tools through the SDK Manager in Android Studio.

After installing the API Level 25 SDK, you can update your project’s
compileSdkVersion to 25 to build and test against the new APIs. If you’re doing
compatibility testing, we recommend updating your app’s targetSdkVersion to 25
to test your app with compatibility behaviors disabled. For details on how to
set up your app with the API Level 25 SDK, see Set
up the Preview.

If you’re adding app shortcuts or circular launcher icons to your app, you can
use Android Studio’s built-in Image Asset Studio to quickly help you create
icons of different sizes that meet the material
design guidelines. You can test your round icons on the Google APIs emulator
for API Level 25, which includes support for round icons and the new Google
Pixel Launcher.


Android Studio and the Google APIs emulator let you quickly create and test
your round icon assets.

If you’re adding image keyboard support, you can use the Messenger and Google
Keyboard apps included in the preview system images for testing as they include
support for this new API.

Scale your tests using Firebase Test Lab for Android

To help scale your testing, make sure to take advantage of Firebase
Test Lab for Android and run your tests in the cloud at no charge during the
preview period on all virtual devices including the Developer Preview 2 (API
25). You can use the automated crawler (Robo Test) to
test your app without having to write any test scripts, or you can upload your
own instrumentation (e.g. Espresso) tests. You can upload your tests here.

Publish your apps to alpha, beta or production channels in Google
Play

After you’ve finished final testing, you can publish your updates compiled
against, and optionally targeting, API 25 to Google Play. You can publish to
your alpha, beta,
or even production channels in the Google Play Developer Console. In this way,
push your app updates to users whose devices are running Android 7.1, such as
Pixel and Android Beta devices.

Get Developer Preview 2 on Your Eligible Device

If you have an eligible device that’s already enrolled in the Android Beta Program, the device will get
the Developer Preview 2 update over the coming week. No action is needed on your
part. If you aren’t yet enrolled in program, the easiest way to get started is
by visiting android.com/beta and opt-in
your eligible Android phone or tablet — you’ll soon receive this preview update
over-the-air. As always, you can also download and flash
this update manually.

As mentioned above, this Developer Preview update is available for Nexus 5X,
Nexus 6P, Nexus 9, and Pixel C devices.

We’re expecting to launch the final release of the Android 7.1.1 in just a few
weeks Starting in December, we’ll roll out Android 7.1.1 to the full lineup of
supported preview devices, as well as the recently launched Pixel and Pixel XL
devices. At that time, we’ll also push the sources to AOSP, so our device
manufacturer partners can bring this new platform update to consumers on their
devices.

Meanwhile, we continue to welcome your feedback in the Developer
Preview issue tracker, N
Preview Developer community, or Android Beta
community as we work towards the final consumer release in December!


Android Developers Blog

Jul 06

Look out for our bi-annual Google Play Developer Sentiment Survey, coming soon

Posted by Dorothy Kelly, Head of Developer Insights, Google Play Developer
Marketing

Core to our mission, we’re always
focused on the user and delivering the best experience possible. This same
principle underlies how Google Play works with developers, as we aim to provide
you with best experience working with us and our products. We can only do this
through understanding what you need and how we can improve. We ran our first
Developer Sentiment Survey in July this year, and heard feedback from over 4,000
developers across 15 countries. This bi-annual survey gathers feedback at scale
from the thousands of developers around the world who publish their apps and
games on Google Play. While it was great to hear how Google Play is working for
you, we also learned how we should improve to enable you to build even more
successful businesses.

This month, you may receive an email from Google Play inviting you to
participate in the next Google Play Developer Sentiment Survey. This invitation
is sent to a selection developers who have opted in to receive Research contacts
in the Developer Console, or to those who are directly managed by Google. You
can review and update your
preferences in the Developer Console to ensure you get the opportunity to be
invited to participate in future surveys.

In this survey we ask you to give us feedback across a number of areas:

  • Develop: Testing, publishing and launching your app or
    game.

  • Grow: Discovery and marketing of your app or game.
  • Engage: Distributing to and engaging with your target
    market.

  • Earn: Pricing and Payment methods.
  • Getting Support: Accessing the information and support you
    need when you have a question.

We use your feedback to decide what we need to focus on next to help you grow
your app or game business. Initiatives announced at I/O 2016, such as improved
betas, prelaunch reporting, the Developer Console app, and pricing templates,
were all developed in response to feedback from developers like you.

If you do receive an invitation to participate in this survey, we really
appreciate you taking the time to complete it. We value your feedback and want
to act on it to help you create apps and games that delight your users, and help
you build a successful business anywhere in the world.


Android Developers Blog

Jun 27

Test on Android 7.1 Developer Preview in Firebase Test Lab

By Ahmed Mounir Gad, Product Manager, Firebase Test Lab

To deliver the best user experience right out of the gate, Firebase Test Lab for Android allows you to test your apps and ensure their compatibility with multiple device configurations, across OS versions, screen orientations, and locales. With a single click, you can run your tests on hundreds of device configurations in Google Cloud and receive your results quickly.

Today, we’re excited to announce the availability of the Android 7.1 Developer Preview on Firebase Test Lab virtual devices. In addition to testing the Android 7.1 Developer Preview on your physical Android Device with the Android Beta program, or on your local Android Emulator, you can use the Firebase Test Lab to scale your app testing to hundreds of Android virtual devices.

You can also use Firebase Test Lab to perform your own testing. If you don’t have any test scripts, Robo test is ideal for doing your basic compatibility testing on the new platform. It crawls your app in an attempt to find crashes. You can also use the Espresso Test Recorder in Android Studio to record your own instrumentation tests without writing any code.

From now until the end of December (12/31/2016), Firebase Test Lab will be offered at no charge on the Firebase Blaze plan for all virtual devices, to help you ensure the compatibility of your app with the Android 7.1 Developer Preview release, as well as with other Android releases.

Prepare your app for API level 25, then go to the Firebase Test Lab console to run your first test.

Happy testing!

Robo tests uncovering a crash on Android 7.1 Developer Preview for the Flood-It! app.


Android Developers Blog

Jun 24

Support Ended for Eclipse Android Developer Tools

By Jamal Eason, Product
Manager, Android

With the release of Android
Studio 2.2, the time has now come to say goodbye to the Eclipse Android
Developer Tools. We have formally ended their support and development. There’s
never been a better time to switch to Android Studio and experience the
improvements we’ve made to the Android development workflow.

Android Studio

Android Studio,
the official IDE for Android, features powerful code editing with advanced
code-completion and refactoring. It includes robust static analysis,
bringing the intelligence of the Android engineering team to you to help you
easily apply Android coding best practices, and includes simultaneous debugging
in both Java and C++ to help fix any bugs that slip through. When you combine
this with performance tooling, a fast, flexible build system, code templates,
GitHub integration, and its high-performance, feature-rich emulator, you get a
deeply Android-tailored development environment for the many form factors of the
OS. It’s the development environment used by 92% of the top 125 Google Play
apps and games, and we’re constantly innovating it to handle every Android
development need.

What’s New in Android Studio 2.2

Android
Studio 2.2 builds on the great features from Android Studio 2.0. There are
over twenty new features that improve development whether you are designing,
iterating, or testing. Notable changes include:

  • Instant Run
    - The super-fast iteration engine now is both more reliable and
    available for more types of changes

  • Layout
    Editor
    - The new user interface designer that makes it easier than
    ever to create beautiful app experiences

  • Constraint
    Layout
    – A new flexible layout engine for building dynamic user
    interfaces – designed to work with the new layout editor

  • C++
    Support
    - CMake and ndk-build are now supported alongside improved
    editing and debug experiences

  • APK
    Analyzer
    - Inspects APKs to help you streamline your APK and debug
    multi-dex
    issues

  • GPU
    Debugger (beta)
    - Captures a stream of OpenGL ES commands and
    replays them with GPU state inspection

  • Espresso
    Test Recorder (beta)
    - Records interactions with your app and
    outputs UI test code

Top Developers Love Android Studio

For our ADT Fans

All of your favorite ADT tools are now part of Android Studio, including DDMS,
Trace Viewer, Network Monitor, and CPU Monitor. We’ve also improved Android
Studio’s accessibility,
including keyboard navigation enhancements and screen reader support.

We announced
that we were ending development and official support for the Android Developer
Tools (ADT) in Eclipse at the end of 2015, including the Eclipse ADT plugin and
Android Ant build system. With the latest updates to Studio, we’ve completed
the transition.

Migrating to Android Studio

To get started, download and install
Android Studio. For most developers, including those with C/C++ projects,
migration is as simple as importing your existing Eclipse ADT projects in
Android Studio with the File > New > Import Project menu
option. For more details on the migration process, check out the migration
guide.

Feedback and Open Source Contributions

We’re dedicated to making Android Studio the best possible integrated
development environment for building Android apps, so if there are missing
features or other challenges preventing you from switching to Android Studio, we want to hear about it [survey] ! You can also file bugs or feature requests
directly with the team, and let us know via our Twitter or Google+ accounts.

Android Studio is an open source
project, available to all at no cost. Check out our Open Source project page if
you’re interested in contributing or learning more.


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