May 24

Group Messaging in Android Auto

Posted by David Nelloms, Software Engineer

Communicating with a group of people is a common use case for many messaging
apps. However, it may be difficult to know how the Android
Auto messaging API applies to group conversations. Here are some tips for
getting started with group messaging in Android Auto:

Conversation Name

When constructing the UnreadConversation builder, you are required to pass in a
name. This is the name of the conversation that is displayed to the user when
messages arrive.

UnreadConversation.Builder unreadConvBuilder =
    new UnreadConversation.Builder(conversationName)
        .setReadPendingIntent(msgHeardPendingIntent)
        .setReplyAction(msgReplyPendingIntent, remoteInput);

For one-on-one conversations, this is simply the name of the other participant.
For group conversations, it is best to choose one of two options for the name:

  1. Conversation title: If your app supports adding a title to group
    conversations, use the title for the name parameter to be consistent with your
    in-app experience. This field is similar to NotificationCompat.MessagingStyle#setConversationTitle.

  2. A list of participants: Build a comma-separated list of participants for the
    name parameter to identify the group. Note that this is read aloud by the
    text-to-speech system, so you may need to abbreviate the list for large groups.
    You should balance allowing users to uniquely identify the group with the time
    taken to listen to messages.

Text to Speech Formatting

Getting text to sound natural using a TTS system is a challenging problem.
There are teams working hard to improve this, but there are steps you can take
to create a better user experience with the current capabilities. The Android
Auto messaging API does not yet have an option for pairing participants with
individual messages in a group conversation. This is problematic for drivers
when there are multiple unread messages from multiple participants in a group
conversation, as the drivers cannot see which group member sent which message.
One solution is to prepend the sender’s name to the message whenever the sender
changes so that the names are read aloud to the driver.

CharSequence currentSender = null;
for (Message message : myMessages) {
    StringBuilder messageText = new StringBuilder();
    CharSequence sender = message.getSender();
    // Maybe append sender to indicate who is speaking.
    if (!TextUtils.isEmpty(sender) && !sender.equals(currentSender)) {
        if (currentSender != null) {
            // Punctuation will briefly pause TTS readout between senders.
            messageText.append(". ");
        }
        currentSender = sender;
        messageText.append(sender.toString().toLowerCase(Locale.getDefault()));
        // Punctuation will separate sender from message in TTS readout.
        messageText.append(": ");
    }
    messageText.append(message.getText());
    unreadConvBuilder.addMessage(messageText.toString());
}

Some things to note about the above sample code:

  • Adding punctuation is not strictly necessary, but it can produce a more
    natural sounding result.

  • The sender names are converted to lowercase. This is workaround for a quirk
    where the TTS implementation vocalizes “. ” as “dot” when preceding a capital
    letter on some devices.

Get participants

In searching for how to handle group messaging, you may have noticed UnreadConversation#getParticipants.
This can be confusing as there is no mechanism to add multiple participants in
the builder. The builder implementation populates the array with the
conversation name passed to its constructor. Internally, Android Auto uses the
singular UnreadConversation#getParticipant,
which returns the first element of the participants array, to populate the title
in the notification view.

Stay tuned

The Android Auto team is working on ways to make messaging with drivers simpler
and more intuitive for app developers. Stay tuned for future updates so that
you can continue to deliver a great user experience!


Android Developers Blog

May 24

Far Cry 3: Bad Side of Town – Mission Objectives and Review

Far Cry 3: Bad Side of Town – Mission Objectives and Review

The 12th Mission of Far Cry 3 known as the Bad Side of Town kicks off where the previous one left off.  If you remember the last level, Citra agreed to help you only if you helped find the object she desired which you did and now she is on your side.  Lets take a quick look at the Far Cry 3: Bad Side of Town – Mission Objectives along with a few tips, review, Pictures and video from the level.

Objectives

  • Explore Badtown
  • locate and visit the bar
  • Play Poker
  • Follow the man in white

Tips/Mini Walkthrough

*To Reach Badtown fast travel to the waypoint on the map which would have opened up and head towards the east of the location.

*Enter the bar to receive the objective.

*Follow the man in the white as soon as he leavs the bar but don’t get too close

*Wait for the man to enter the building and the level will end.

Pictures

badtown


Ruins


Out of the temple


Going through the road


Going through the jungle

Video (Follow the main in white without getting noticed.)

What are your thoughts about the Far Cry 3: Bad Side of Town Mission Objectives?

Gaming,Cricket,WWE and lots more

May 23

EyeEm Improves User Engagement through Android Design

By Leticia Lago, Google Play team

EyeEm is a global community for photographers that goes beyond sharing photos with friends: photographers can share tips, take part in missions, and sell their photos. To win more customers, a design that best showcases photos from the community is very important for this Berlin-based company.

With the idea of bringing a beautiful, simple experience to their fast growing base of Android users, the team recently embarked on a redesign of their app. Following the Android design principles, they stripped back the UI and simplified navigation. This allowed them to deliver a more streamlined app experience, along with a clean, crisp design that presents photos beautifully. And it paid off. According to Ramzi Rizk, EyeEm co-founder and CTO, “Our new design helped improve user growth and retention across the board, in every single metric we have.”

In the following video, Rizk and colleague Matias Castello, Product Head of Mobile, talk about their experience applying Android design to their app and the improvements in user engagement it has achieved:

Resources to help you with design

To learn more about how to design your apps for Android devices and achieve great user engagement and retention, be sure to check out these resources:

  • Android Design — all the information you need to understand and implement Android design principles in your app.
  • Design.Bytes — presented by the Google designers who created Material Design and apps, such as the Google I/O 2014 app, these videos provide a fun and informative introduction to Android design.
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Android Developers Blog

May 22

WWE Smackdown 17/01/2014 – Results, Review and Analysis

WWE Smackdown 17/01/2014 – Results, Review and Analysis

World Wrestling Entertainment’s Friday Night Smackdown that will air tonight but was taped on Tuesday night took place from the DCU Center in Worcester, Massachusetts.  Below are the full results from the show.

Alexander Rusev defeated Tyson Kidd

WWE Smackdown
The match between The New Age Outlaws and Cody Rhodes-Goldust was interrupted by Vickie Guerrero.  Vickie claimed it will be every man for himself at Royal Rumble.  Just as Vickie was speaking, Billy Gunn took the advantaged and rolled up Rhodes for a win.

A backstage segment with CM Punk and Renee Young saw  Punk calling out all the three members of The Shield tonight.

Paul Heyman came out to the ring and praised Brock Lesnar.  Heyman said Lesnar will be at Raw this week.  Big Show’s music then hit and out he came.  Show entered the ring but Heyman managed to run away through the crowd.

Eva Marie was present in the ring and announced  the next match, Rey Mysterio Vs Alberto Del Rio. Mysterio won the match but Del Rio locked up the cross arm breaker after the match was over.
Naomi defeated Tamina Snuka
The next segment saw the Wyatt Family making their way out as fans chanted for Daniel Bryan.  Bray claimed he wanted to grow up like his father  but he was not good enough.  He also said that he was destined for greater things as he crawled out of  a hole and Sister Abigail to save him.  He further said he gave a chance to Bryan to walk with the reapers but he will now burn.

CM Punk was with Renee Young as he called out The Shield and The New Age Outlaws.  Renee Young asked if that was a career suicide and he said it was a gift for authority to do what they want.

The Bella twins announced the next match as Big E Langston against Fandango.  Big E won the match.

Backstage Renee Young spoke to the shield about their royal rumble plans.  All the members claimed it was every man for himself but at the end of the day they’ll remain the shield.

Aksana announced the next match between The Usos and Jack Swagger-Antonio Cesaro.  The Uso’s eventually won the match.

The final segment saw CM Punk calling out The Shield and the New Age Outlaws.  The Shield and Kane also got involved.  Kane claimed that Punk was in Royal Rumble because the authority wanted him to main event at Wrestlemania.  Punk said otherwise and insulted Kane.  The smackdown show ended with Kane Chokeslamming punk in the center of the ring.

What are your thoughts about WWE Smackdown 17/01/2014 – Results, Review and Analysis?

Gaming,Cricket,WWE and lots more

May 22

Android Studio 2.0 Preview: Android Emulator

Posted by, Jamal Eason, Product Manager, Android

An early preview of the new Android Emulator is now available to try out. As a part of Android Studio 2.0, the latest version of the Android Emulator can help you test your app on a wide range of screens size and configurations beyond the physical Android hardware you use to test.Moreover, using the official Android emulator enables you to test with latest Android versions. Building on this foundation, the top two benefits of new Android emulator are:

  • Speed & Performance: When emulating the latest Android 6.0 release (Marshmallow), we now support Symmetric Multi-Processing and have made significant I/O improvements in both the emulator and ADB. This means you will have faster performance when you are testing your app.
  • Usability & User Interface: The new Android Emulator includes a brand new user interface to make the emulator easy to use. You no longer have to rely on command-line parameters to use the Android emulator. Common tasks and emulator features are now just a mouse click or a keyboard shortcut away.

We previewed the user interface at the Android Dev Summit. You can try it out today along with the new version of ADB for faster APK installation and file transfers to the emulator. Check out the video for a demonstration of the new Android Emulator.




Android Dev Summit 2015: Emulator Demo

We are seeking early feedback to continue to deliver the experience and features that will make you more productive.

New Features in Android Emulator Preview


Performance Improvements


  • CPU Performance

    Android Studio now uses CPU acceleration on x86 emulator system images by default. Combined with new Symmetric Multi-Processor (SMP) support in Android 6.0 Marshmallow system images, the Android emulators can perform even faster than many physical Android devices. Multi-core support not only makes your apps and the emulator run faster but it provides the added advantage of speeding up common developer tasks such as installing APKs. Also, with SMP you can test apps that specifically target multi-processor Android devices.


  • Faster ADB

    In addition to faster CPU speeds in the emulator, there are a number of under-the-hood improvements that will make the experience faster. One of the bottlenecks in the development process that we worked on is the speed of pushing data between Android Studio and your device using ADB (Android Debug Bridge). When you use Android 6.0 Marshmallow and higher system images with the new Android Emulator, you can now push files across ADB up to five times faster than a real device. This will help you if you push large APK or files during your app development cycle.


User Interface

  • Toolbar

    The new interface exposes some of the most common emulator actions in a new toolbar and control panel instead of solely relying on command line options. For the preview, the Android Emulator toolbar enables actions, such as volume control, screen rotation, and screen-shots of the emulator window.


  • Window Zooming & Scaling

    Now you can resize your window simply by dragging a corner. You can also zoom and scroll to get a closer look at a portion of your screen.


Left: Zooming
Right: Window Scaling


  • Drag & Drop

    With the new emulator, you can not only drag and drop APKs for quick installation, but you can also drag and drop any file to your emulator’s internal SD card to help in testing.

Drag and Drop Files


  • Extended UI Controls

    In the extended controls window, additional options help you validate and test features in your app. As shown below, you can initiate a range of emulator actions such as making a virtual call, sending a virtual SMS, or controlling the power level of the emulator. You can additionally send a single GPS location point to the emulator or play back a custom set of KML or GPX points as well.

Phone Controls

Battery Controls

We are continuing to add more functionality and we will keep you up to date as we add more features.

What’s Next & Setup

This is just the beginning of developments on the Android Emulator, so expect more features such as support more APIs levels, and adding more sensors with future versions of Android Studio. The new emulator along with Android Studio are available today on the Android Studio canary channel and tools preview channel.

Click here for details on how to setup the preview of the new Android Emulator.

We appreciate your feedback. Connect with us, the Android Studio development team, on Google+.


Android Developers Blog

May 21

Improved Game Testing with Google Play Games Management API

By Ben Frenkel, Google Play Games team

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We’re always looking to help developers improve the gaming experience for their users on Google Play. So today, we’ve expanded our existing suite of Management APIs to let you fully control all resources in your Google Play Games-enabled game during development and testing, with better support for alpha and beta groups.

Let’s take a quick dive into the expanded offering.

  • Reset a single tester’s state for any resource (e.g., achievements, leaderboards), or do it for all resources at once. For example, you can now completely reset a given tester’s data if they’ve ended up in a bad state due to an experimental build. You can do this for individual instances or all instances of achievements, events, quests, or leaderboards scores.
  • Reset the state of a single draft resource for all testers, or do it for all draft resources at once. You can now reset all draft leaderboards in your game before publishing with a single API call. This ensures the members of your alpha or beta communities don’t have an unfair advantage on release day. You can do this for individual instances or all instances of achievements, events, quests, or leaderboards scores.
  • Clear global match state for all real time or turn based matches composed solely of testers. You can now reset all turn-based matches on release day. This will ensure that all matches from that point on are on the release version of the game. This is available for both real-time or turn-based games.

These updates make it far less complex and error prone to manage data during testing, saving you time and improving the rate at which you can make and test changes to your games.

Play Games Management API background

The Management API is a set of tools that enable developers to do things like manage tester data and clean up bogus leaderboard score submissions. Developers can also use the API to control and manipulate resources (e.g., achievements, events, multiplayer match data).

Getting started

You can get started with the latest version of the Management API right now. Review the updated API reference documentation, start with an example management interface, or download the sample client libraries to get on your way.

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Android Developers Blog

May 21

Introducing a New Guide, “The Secrets to App Success on Google Play”

By Dom Elliott, Google Play team

With more than 50 billion apps and games downloaded in total, Google Play is helping developers and content creators around the world build successful businesses. In fact, we paid out more than $ 5 billion over the last year to developers for creating incredible apps that are changing the way people communicate, live, work, and play.

Developing an app or game and distributing it on Google Play is a good start, but it’s only the first step to building a sustainable business. That’s why we’ve written “The Secrets to App Success on Google Play,” a detailed playbook on the best practices and tools you can use to maximize the reach, retention, and revenue of your new app.

The guide is separated into the following sections:

  • Publishing on Google Play — using the Google Play Developer Console to distribute your app to over 1 billion Android users worldwide.
  • Quality — The fundamentals of building a great app and an insight into the Google Play guidelines and policies.
  • Discoverability & reach — Maximizing your app’s discoverability and reaching the widest audience possible.
  • Engagement & retention — Converting installations into active users and improving user retention.
  • Monetization — Monetization strategies to generate ongoing, growing revenue streams.
  • Measurement with Google Analytics — Understanding your users and improving your app experience, conversions, and marketing.
  • Going global — Launching your app in local markets around the world.

Download the guide now in English (PDF, 11MB) or get it on Google Play. We’ll release the guide in more languages in the coming months. If you’re in the US or the UK, we also have a limited number of printed copies that we are offering to send for free. Request a printed copy here.

Once you’ve checked out the guide, we’d love to hear your feedback so we can continue to improve, let us know what you think.

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Android Developers Blog

May 20

Download Photoscape 3.6.5 Latest Update 2014 free

Download Photoscape 3.6.5 Latest Update 2014 free

Photoscape 3.6.5 Final Free Download Full Version New Latest Update 2014. Applications for a good photo editing and producing images with a variety of cool frames. This software is a popular image editor tool used by most people, especially women who like to photograph beautiful plus Software. Photo scape 3.6.6 and the latest version has come with a variety of the latest addition of features that can be downloaded for free.

Download here

Free Software Download

May 20

What’s New in Android: O Developer Preview 2 & More

Posted by: Dave Burke, VP of Engineering

android-o-logo.png

With billions of Android devices around the world, Android has surpassed our wildest expectations. Today at Google I/O, we showcased a number of ways we’re pushing Android forward, with the O Release, new tools for developers to help create more performant apps, and an early preview of a project we call Android Go — a new experience that we’re building for entry-level devices.
Fluid experiences in Android O
It’s pretty incredible what you can do on mobile devices today, and how easy it is to rely on them as computers in our pockets. In the O release we’ve focused on creating fluid experiences that make Android even more powerful and easy to use, and today we highlighted some of those:

  • Picture-in-picture: lets users manage two tasks simultaneously, whether it’s video calling your friend while checking your calendar, or reading a new recipe while watching a video on a specific cooking technique. We’ve designed PIP to provide seamless multitasking on any size screen, and it’s easy for apps to support it.
  • Notification dots extend the reach of notifications, a new way for developers to surface activity in their app, driving engagement. Built on our unique and highly regarded notification system, dots work with zero effort for most apps – we even extract the color of the dot from your icon. 
  • Autofill with Google simplifies setting up a new device and synchronizing passwords by bringing Chrome’s Autofill feature to Android. Once a user opts-in, Autofill will work out-of-the-box for most apps. Developers can optimize their apps for Autofill by providing hints about the type of data expected or add support in custom views. 
  • A new homescreen for Android TV makes it easy for users to find, preview, and watch content provided by apps. Apps can publish one or more channels, and users can control the channels that appear on the homescreen. You’ll be able to get started with creating channels using the new TvProvider support library APIs. 
  • Smart Text Selection: In Android O, we’re applying on-device machine learning to copy/paste, to let Android recognize entities like addresses, URLs, telephone numbers, and email addresses. This makes the copy/paste experience better by selecting the entire entity and surfacing the right apps to carry out an action based on the type of entity.
  • TensorFlow Lite: As Android continues to take advantage of machine learning to improve the user experience, we want our developer partners to be able to do the same. Today we shared an early look at TensorFlow Lite, an upcoming project based on TensorFlow, Google’s open source machine learning library. TensorFlow Lite is specifically designed to be fast and lightweight for embedded use cases. Since many on-device scenarios require real-time performance, we’re also working on a new Neural Network API that TensorFlow can take advantage of to accelerate computation. We plan to make both of these available to developers in a maintenance update to O later this year, so stay tuned!  
(L) Android O: Picture-in-picture, (R) Android O: Notification dots

Working on the Vitals in Android
We think Android’s foundations are critical, so we’re investing in Android Vitals, a project focused on optimizing battery life, startup time, graphic rendering time, and stability. Today we showcased some of the work we’ve done so far, and introduced new tools to help developers understand power, performance, and reliability issues in their apps:

  • System optimizations: in Android O, we’ve done a lot of work across the system to make apps run faster and smoother. For example we made extensive changes in our runtime – including new optimizations like concurrent compacting garbage collection, code locality, and more. 
  • Background limits: up to now it’s been fairly easy for apps to unintentionally overuse resources while they’re in the background, and this can adversely affect the performance of the system. So in O, we’ve introduced new limits on background location and wi-fi scans, and changes in the way apps run in the background. These boundaries prevent overuse — they’re about increasing battery life and freeing up memory.
  • New Android Vitals Dashboards in the Play Console: today we launched six Play Console dashboards to help you pinpoint common issues in your apps – excessive crash rate, ANR rate, frozen frames, slow rendering, excessive wakeups, and stuck wake locks, including how many users are affected, with guidance on the best way to address the issues. You can visit the Play Console today to see your app’s data, then learn how to address any issues.

Android Go
Part of Android’s mission is to bring computing to everyone. We’re excited about seeing more users come online for the first time as the price of entry level smart phones drop, and we want to help manufacturers continue to offer lower-cost devices that provide a great experience for these users. Today we gave a sneak peek of a new experience that we’re building specifically for Android devices that have 1GB or less of memory — Internally we call it “Android Go,” and it’s designed around three things

  • OS: We’re optimizing Android O to run smoothly and efficiently on entry-level devices
  • Apps: We’re also designing Google apps to use less memory, storage space, and mobile data, including apps such as YouTube Go, Chrome, and Gboard. 
  • Play: On entry-level devices, Play store will promote a better user experience by highlighting apps that are specifically designed for these devices — such as apps that use less memory, storage space, and mobile data — while still giving users access to the entire app catalog.
The Android Go experience will ship in 2018 for all Android devices that have 1GB or less of memory. We recommend getting your apps ready for these devices soon — take a look at the Building for Billions to learn about the importance of offering a useful offline state, reducing APK size, and minimizing battery and memory use.

O Developer Preview 2, Now in Public Beta
Today’s release of O Developer Preview 2 is our first beta-quality candidate, available to test on your primary phone or tablet. We’re inviting those who want to try the beta release of Android O to enroll now at android.com/beta — it’s an incredibly convenient way to preview Android O on your Nexus 5X, 6P, and Player, as well as Pixel, Pixel XL, or Pixel C device.

With more users starting to get Android O on their devices through the Android Beta program, now is the time to test your apps for compatibility, resolve any issues, and publish an update as soon as possible. See the migration guide for steps and a recommended timeline.

Later today you’ll be able to download the updated tools for developing on Android O, including the latest canaries of Android Studio, SDK, and tools, Android O system images, and emulators. Along with those, you’ll be able to download support library 26.0.0 beta and other libraries from our new Maven repo. The change to Maven from SDK Manager means a slight change to your build configuration, but gives you much more flexibility in how you integrate library updates with your CI systems.

When you’re ready to get started developing with Android O, visit the O Developer Preview site for details on all of the features you can use in your apps, including notification channels and dots, picture-in-picture, autofill, and others. APIs have changed since the first developer preview, so take a look at the diff report to see where your code might be affected.

Thanks for the feedback you’ve given us so far. Please keep it coming, about Android O features, APIs, issues, or requests — see the Feedback and Bugs page for details on where to report feedback.


Android Developers Blog